Sometimes trans and intersex people find themselves subject to ongoing, unwanted media attention. If this happens to you, you don't just have to put up with it. The Press Complaints Commission has been very good at calling off journalists who are harassing individuals, and we hope the organisation that replaces it will be able to do the same. If you need help in this situation, contact us and we will help you to explore your options.

Serious, ongoing pursuit by journalists can also be covered by ordinary laws on harassment. If you feel threatened or feel that your family is at risk, call the police. You can ask to speak to an LGBT liaison officer, who will be able to assist you. If you are not sure about contacting the police immediately but want to keep your options open, use a diary to record the dates and times of any approaches by the media. This can help to support your case if you decide to take action later.

Harassment by journalists often extends to social media. You might want to think about making some of your Facebook information private or friends-only, and avoid friending anybody you don't know well.

When you are being repeatedly pursued by the media, it is unlikely that talking to them will make them go away. If you really feel you want to speak out because of what is happening to you, talk to us about the most effective way to approach it.

Lifelong Learning Programme logo Follow TMW on
facebook logo Twitter logo
Valid CSS!